laissez faire marketing


This video, narrated by Laissez Faire Club Dir. Doug Hill, is pristine ad copy. Scary, persuasive, informative: yesteryear’s infomercial in a no-nonsense flashcard display. Playing on decidedly Libertarian anxieties and your need for evidence (no matter where it comes from), it gets you nodding “yes” until, well, later. It creates the need for proof then leads you to action by “claiming” the free book, Non-GMO Guide, Food Secrets for a Long, Healthy Life and a “risk-free” trial subscription to Laissez Faire Letter “for less than your phone bill,” in addition to some other bonuses that are sure to enhance your existence.

“Fox News has already been forced to censor coverage of this scandal. So this video could be banned at any time.”

Well, that does it. If Fox news has been “forced” into censorship, the message in the video must indeed be credible! This information alone makes me want to click on the big blue SUBSCRIBE button that appears well into the meat of the presentation. But wait: since when is Fox News “forced to censor” anything? Oh, I get it. If I’m a Fox News consumer, my own source of information has been undermined by the Feds, which plays beautifully for signing up with the Laissez Faire Letter. Now I can get real news.

Essentially, under the auspices of deep concern for your health, this sophisticated copy is campaign rhetoric, not-so thinly veiled. Why the ruse? Laissez Faire Books is a well known Libertarian organization. Why not make the anti-state message very clear in the beginning just to attract the right crowd, then pitch the Non-GMO Guide in the end? My guess is that selling a book slamming Monsanto while aligning politically to the likes of McMorris Rodgers and the Koch brothers may lend the appearance of, how you say, a double standard?

The book is the hook that lands you in the boat. The pitch initially hawks what may in fact be a useful read, then shoots itself in the foot by trying to guide you into a political movement. You go in fighting Big Seed and come out bearing more arms than you know what to do with.

I only ask Mr. Hill how he happens to know my phone bill and whether that might constitute an overreach on his part.

Leave a Comment